XCT technology drives Lutron Radio Powr Savr occupancy sensor

The Lutron Radio Powr Savr occupancy sensor advances motion-sensing technology.

The Lutron Radio Powr Savr occupancy sensor advances motion-sensing technology.

When I visited the Lutron booth (Lutron Electronics Co. Inc., Coopersburg, PA) at the Lightfair show in early May, I was told about an upcoming occupancy sensor that would use new technology and overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional sensors. Namely, this sensor would be able to detect small movements, such as typing, and keep the lights on. Conventional sensors would turn the lights off after the programmed period, leaving the person in the dark.
   Today, Lutron introduced that sensor, calling it the Radio Powr Savr occupancy/vacancy sensor. The unit is a wireless device that is installed on the ceiling and paired with a compatible Lutron dimmer or switch. The sensor doesn’t require any wiring.
   The exciting part of this introduction is the company’s XCT Technology which uses algorithms that enable the device to detect small motions and reliably distinguish them from background noise or interference that typically cause false ons/offs with conventional sensors. This enhanced signal-processing ability enables Radio Powr Savr to keep the lights on when someone is typing, writing, or flipping pages and to turn the lights off only when the space is truly empty.
   Occupancy sensors typically generate an annual energy savings of $85. That savings is great until you’re the person sitting in a room having to wave your arm in the air every 10 min. to keep the lights on. This new introduction overcomes that problem. Obviously, if you couple the sensor with a dimmer, additional energy savings can be realized. According to Lutron, depending on the overall system configuration, Radio Powr Savr can take 25% to 40% off of the lighting electricity used in a given space.
   It’s these kinds of developments that, bit-by-bit, are helping commercial building designers, builders, and owners put more “green” in their facilities. The “green” part is a feel good. The money savings make a difference to the bottom line, which, ultimately is what matters.—Gary L. Parr

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