DOE Updates High-Efficiency Parking Structure Lighting Specification

Dept. of EnergyA CBEA Project Team has updated the High-Efficiency Parking Structure Lighting Specification. First released in 2009, version 1.1, released on February 15, 2012, has updates related to IES TM-21 and anticipated RP-20 requirements. In addition to focusing on the efficiency of each of these technologies, the Project Team investigated how the role of controls and the specific use of each technology can lead to even greater energy savings. The maximum allowed installed power density within the specification is 40% below ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2007. Additional energy savings are possible from the use of lighting controls and daylighting.

Questions on this specification should be sent to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at CBEA@pnnl.gov.

DOE Establishes ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 Reference Standard

ASHRAECommercial and high-rise residential buildings, including federal buildings, must now meet requirements in ASHRAE/IESNA’s 2007 energy efficiency standard, under recent rulings issued by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) that finds the standard saves more energy than the 2004 version.

ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007, , has been established by the DOE as the commercial building reference standard for state building energy codes under the federal Energy Conservation and Production Act. As a result, states are required to certify by July 20, 2013, that they have reviewed and updated the provisions of their commercial building code regarding energy efficiency, including a demonstration that the provisions of their commercial building codes regarding energy efficiency meet or exceed 90.1-2007.

The DOE also has issued a rule that requires new federal buildings, for which the design for construction begins on or after Oct. 11, 2012, to meet the requirements of 90.1-2007. Prior to the new rules, federal and commercial buildings had to meet requirements in the 2004 standard.

The DOE noted that the newer version of the standard contained 11 positive impacts on energy efficiency. These impacts included changes made through the public review process in which users of the standard comment and offer guidance on proposed requirements. The positive impacts include:

  • Increased requirements for building vestibules;
  • Removal of data processing centers and hotel rooms from exceptions to HVAC
  • Modification of requirements regarding demand controlled ventilation, fan power limitations, retail display lighting requirements, cooling tower testing requirements, commercial boiler requirements, part load fan requirements, opaque envelope requirements and fenestration envelope requirements.

ASHRAE and IES currently are working on the 2013 standard, having published the 2010 last year. Some 30 percent energy savings can be achieved using the 2010 version of Standard 90.1 vs. the 2004 standard. Without plug loads, site energy savings are 32.6 percent and energy cost savings 30.1 percent. Including plug loads, the site energy savings are estimated at 25.5 percent and energy cost savings 24 percent.

Since being developed in response to the energy crisis in the 1970s, Standard 90.1 now influences building designs worldwide. It has become the basis for building codes, and the standard for building design and construction throughout the United States. ASHRAE and IES publish a revised version of the standard every three years.

DC power: Coming soon to an office near you

There’s a movement underfoot to bring DC power to commercial building interiors. Members of the EMerge Alliance agreed upon a standard, but the announcement last month didn’t make much of a splash in the press. To tell you the truth, I put the press release aside until this week when I spoke with alliance chair Brian Patterson of Armstrong World Industries. He filled me in on the year-old organization, the work it is doing, and the implications of this standard. EMerge Alliance Standard Flow Chart For instance, building owners soon could find it easier to reconfigure space for new tenants.  Instead of rewiring a floor, owners can plug light fixtures into the ceiling grid. They’ll move fixtures around as easily as furniture. Facility managers will be able to integrate native wind energy into their buildings without first converting it to alternating current.
The statement from the alliance said the standard establishes a more efficient means of powering digital, DC-powered devices, such as sensors, lighting, and IT equipment. It creates an integrated, open platform for power, interior infrastructures, controls, and peripheral devices to facilitate the hybrid use of AC and DC power within buildings.
EMerge Alliance members favor the use of 24-V DC power, which allows for a “plug and play” approach to rewiring, said Patterson. He added that low voltage no longer equates to low performance.
Founding members are Armstrong World Industries, Johnson Controls, Nextek Power Systems, Osram Sylvania, and Worthington Armstrong Venture. Convia, Creston Electronics, Herman Miller, Lutron Electronics, Southern California Edison, Steelcase, and Tyco Electronics are among the participating members. The not-for-profit organization seeks additional members.
The alliance is establishing a third-party registration and evaluation program for labeling products based on the standard. The program is scheduled to begin this fall. Standard-compliant devices will be branded with the EMerge designation.
Check out the EMerge Alliance website for more informational, including a 3-minute instructional video. If you are attending Greenbuild in Phoenix next week, stop by the Alliance’s booth 2252. — Jim Carper

AAMA updates fenestration standard

aamalogoThe American Architectural Manufacturers Association, Schaumburg, IL, has issued an update to AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/ I.S.2/A440-08, NAFS—North American Fenestration Standard/Specification for windows, doors, and skylights. That update is now available for electronic download from the organization’s website. It includes editorial revisions to the 129-page standard originally published in January 2008. “Editorial changes and additional corrections have been made to Table 4, which outlines optional performance grades for unit skylights, tubular daylighting devices, and roof windows. Table 27, which outlines gateway performance requirements, was also updated for editorial changes and corrections,” said Ken Brenden, AAMA technical services manager. “The replacement pages included in Update #3 can be inserted into copies of the standard published in January 2008 and the removed pages may be kept for reference,” he added.—Gary L. Parr