A new idea in LED lighting


Redwood Systems launched its network-based technology for LED lighting and building-performance systems in March. The new technology  is based on the idea that LED lighting presents opportunity to create a unified network-based digital platform for smart buildings, helping building owners and designers reduce energy costs while providing control and automation in commercial lighting never before possible.
   At Lightfair last week, Commercial Building Products asked executive Jeremy Stieglitz to demonstrate the product. By combining three typically discrete systems (power, communications, sensors) into one low-voltage networked system, Redwood says its platform “will make smart buildings vastly simpler, easier, and lower cost to own and operate.”
   Redwood Systems’ CEO is Dave Leonard,  formerly general manager of Cisco’s Ethernet Switching Business Unit. Mark Covaro, Redwood’s CTO, is the former principal power design engineer for Cisco’s widely deployed power-over-Ethernet platform.
   “Redwood’s vision is to use LED lighting’s low voltage to power not just lighting, but create a digital network to manage and efficiently optimize lighting, heating, venting, air conditioning, plug loads, window shading, and just about everything else that uses power in a building,” said Leonard. “Using a network-based platform approach, we will deliver smart lighting systems that revolutionize how lights, and buildings, are powered, controlled, and optimized.” —Jim Carper

Rockin’ the prairie

Jumers_ring_172bRock Island, IL, isn’t on my radar. Though it and I are both in the Land of Lincoln, it’s out west, on the Mississippi River, while I’m east, in Chicago, on Lake Michigan. When I do think of my fellow Prairie State metropolis, it’s along the lines of Quad Cities or Rock Island Railroad, not high-stakes gambling.
Then a press release crossed my desk about Jumer’s Casino & Hotel in that fair city. The $151 million complex consists of a 170,000-sq.-ft. casino/entertainment center, and a five-story, 205-room hotel. It opened in December 2008. The photos are stunning. The casino changes colors in broad daylight, according to the release, because the aluminum-composite material (ACM) skin changes colors as different wavelengths of light are reflected back to the viewer’s eye.
“With each shift of the sun and clouds, it changes color, from red to orange to almost brown,” said Guy Davidson, KKE Jumers_exterior_047bArchitects, Minneapolis.
Jumer’s is clad in two colors of Alucobond ACM—Spectra Cupral and Texas Copper. Alcan Composites USA, Mooresville, NC, makes the product, which consists of two sheets of 0.02-inch-thick aluminum thermobonded to a plastic core. General contractor was Kraus-Anderson Construction, Minneapolis. M.G. McGrath Architectural Sheet Metal, Maplewood, MN, and SGH, Omaha, NE, installed the material.
Jumers_logo_119b

I feel a road trip coming on.Jim Carper

Two to tango: Indelval and Salto

CBC Flooring, Commack, NY, has tapped South America and Europe for inspiration. The company is now the exclusive North American source of Indelval brand rubber flooring from Argentina.
And it launched a brand of its own, called Salto Exceptional Flooring. (In Italian, “salto” means to jump or to leap. “The Salto brand is characterized by leaping into the future or forward thinking in the commercial flooring industry,” a company executive said.)
Indelval products are made with a high content of natural rubber harvested directly from rubber trees. The flooring is free of PVCs, plasticizers, halogens, formaldehydes, heavy metals, and asbestos.

The flooring is free of PVCs, plasticizers, halogens, formaldehydes, heavy metals, and asbestos.

The flooring is free of PVCs, plasticizers, halogens, formaldehydes, heavy metals, and asbestos.

Rubber flooring is often spec’d for sanitary flooring in laboratories, clinics and hospitals; for conductive flooring when there is a need to control electrostatic discharges; for installations where heavy traffic requires a durable floor; for transport flooring for buses and trains; and as sports flooring, including glueless interlocking options.
Indelval-lobby
The product has a good green story: the color pigments are eco-friendly, the manufacturer recycles waste from the manufacturing process, and  it uses only recyclable packaging materials.
The company says the products and installation systems will contribute to a number of LEED credits, including Materials and Resources Recycled Content 4.1 and 4.2, Reuse 3.1 and 3.2 and IEQ Credit 4.1 and 4.3 for indoor air quality.
The Salto brand “is designed to satisfy unmet market demands, irrespective of material,” said Jeff Collum, CBC’s director of flooring.
Unica, the first product in the line, is a recycled 18-inch by 18-inch limestone tile with 80% recycled content: 10% post-consumer and 70% pre-consumer recycled content. No two tiles look exactly the same. They are available in 28 colorways.
CBC says Unica is California Section 1350 compliant, the basis for many indoor air-quality certifications. The tile and installation system contribute to LEED credits, including Materials and Resources Recycled Content 4.1 and 4.2, Reuse 3.1; and IEQ Credit 4.1 and 4.3 for indoor air quality.
The product is so new that photos are not yet available. I had thought about hiring some paparazzi to stake out the factory and grab some shots. But the budget choice was paying for pix or attending Greenbuild. I’ll see you in Phoenix. Ciao. Jim Carper

Wall art in a box

The Moz Designs Ocean Waves kit can spruce up your public spaces.

The Moz Designs Ocean Waves kit can spruce up your public spaces.

Got a big public wall that needs some dressin’ up? Don’t want to pay some artist a fortune to paint a mural that makes people shake their heads. You might try the Móz Tides product from Móz Designs Inc., Oakland, CA. Móz Tides is a kit that consists of visually-dynamic decorative aluminum panels and the necessary mounting hardware to create your own artwork. The  Móz Tides panels “create a dramatic centerpiece that brings a fresh style and flourish to a new site or interior ‘make over.’” Ocean Waves, the first set of panels in the Móz Tides collection, “creates a multi-dimensional experience that mimics the ebb and flow of the ocean.” Kits contain both concave and convex panels to create a floating effect, rising approximately 3 7/8 in. off the wall. The panels can be mounted horizontally or vertically and are available in 4- and 5-ft. lengths.—Gary L. Parr