Stratford, ON to investigate upgrade to LEDs

Stratford ON

Stratford, ON, is famous for the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. Perhaps they'll also become famous for their LED lighting.

The City of Stratford, Ontario, has started a pilot project that will evaluate replacing existing streetlights (potentially as many as 4,000 units) with energy-efficient LED fixtures. This project has helped earn Stratford become one of the “Top Seven Intelligent Communities for 2012″ by the Intelligent Community Forum (ICF) a New York-based think tank dedicated to studying the use of information and communications technology to create the community of the 21st Century.

Stratford shares the kudos with communities having populations and economies many times its size: Austin, Texas; Oulu, Finland; Quebec City, Quebec; Riverside, California; Saint John, New Brunswick and Taichung City, Taiwan. All seven communities were feted last week at ICF’s annual “Building The Broadband Economy” summit conference in New York City. The goal of the awards program is to increase awareness of the role that broadband communications and information access technologies play in shaping the economic and social development of communities worldwide.

The pilot project will include Toshiba’s LED roadway and area lighting fixtures. These fixtures are a direct replacement for conventional high intensity discharge (HID) lighting, such as high-pressure sodium or metal halide lamps. With the new LED lighting fixtures, Stratford could save up to 30% in energy costs.

Stratford, Ontario is a city of 32,000 in southwestern Ontario, famous for the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. The city was twice designated one of the world’s Top Seven Intelligent Communities, in 2011 and 2012, by the New York-based broadband think tank, the Intelligent Community Forum.

SOURCE Awards Winners Announced

Cooper LIghtingCooper Lighting has announced the winners of the 35th Annual SOURCE Awards national lighting design competition. The winners were recognized at LIGHTFAIR International 2012 in Las Vegas, NV. Five professional awards and six student awards were presented.

Top honors in the Professional Commercial Category went to Focus Lighting, Inc., New York, N.Y., and the design team of Paul Gregory, principal designer; Michael Cummings, principal lighting designer; Christine Hope, senior lighting designer; Scott Hay, lighting designer; and Dan Nichols, project manager for the lighting of The Chandelier lounge and bar located at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas. In addition, Focus Lighting, Inc. was also honored with an Award of Recognition for the lighting of the Dinosaur Hall at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, located in Los Angeles, Calif. The design team for that project included Paul Gregory, principal lighting designer; Juan Pablo Lira, senior lighting designer; Hilary Manners, lighting designer; and Kenneth Schutz, project manager.

In the Professional Residential Category, top honors went to Robert Singer, president, and Jason Diaz, lighting designer of Robert Singer and Associates, Inc., Basalt, Colo. for the lighting design of a townhome located in Vail, Colo.

Two Honorable Mention awards were presented, one in the Commercial Category and one in the Residential Category. Denver-based RLN and the design team of Rachel Petro Fitzgerald, lighting designer; AnneMarie Dienstbach, project manager; Marc Herndon, lead interior designer; Sarah McGarry, interior designer; and Kristian Barowsky, technical support assistant were honored for the lighting design of the law firm of Dorsey & Whitney, LLP located in Denver, Colo. In the Residential Category, Christopher M. Thompson, principal; James L. Sultan, senior lighting designer; and Kimberly D. Taylor, lighting designer of Seattle, Wash. based Studio Lux, LLC received an Honorable Mention award for their work on the Indian Wells Residence, an 11,030 square foot home located in Indian Wells, Calif.

In the Student Category, students in the design, architectural, lighting and engineering disciplines enter conceptual lighting design installations. Six awards were given: one Winner, two Honorable Mentions and three Awards of Recognition. The team of Francis D’Andrea, Derek Sommers and Austin Weller from the University of Cincinnati picked up the winning honor for their conceptual lighting design project of an upscale health spa titled Full Disclosure. Also from University of Cincinnati, Jennifer Sullivan was awarded an Honorable Mention award for her project of a retail cosmetics store called Orchard Beauty, Orchard Road. In addition, Ali Patterson from Ball State University was honored with an Honorable Mention Sustainable Design Award for her project of a Mountain Spirit Healthcare Facility.

An Award of Recognition honor was presented to the team of Nicolas Payan, Anna Pogorelova and Lawrence Rocha-Benavides from the University of Cincinnati for their COSMOS restaurant while Melina C. B. Pereira, from the University of Cincinnati also won for her Chicago Convention Center – Fulton Square Building Renovation lighting design. Kristin Millican from Mississippi College also received an Award of Recognition for her art gallery project titled A Site Gallery.

The University of Cincinnati students were under the direction of Brian Davies, associate professor at University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning. Millican was under the direction of Mandy Berdami, assistant professor and program coordinator of interior design at Mississippi College and Patterson was under the direction of Thelma Lazo-Flores, PhD, assistant professor in interior design at Ball State University.

Professional winners Focus Lighting, Inc. and Robert Singer and Associates, Inc. received a $2,000 monetary award. Student winners D’Andrea, Sommers and Weller split a $1,500 award and Sullivan and Patterson were given $500 for their Honorable Mention awards. All winners were presented with a crystal trophy and offered an invitation to attend a complimentary class at the SOURCE, Cooper Lighting’s state-of-the-art education center located at the company’s headquarters in Peachtree City, Ga. The students’ instructors are also invited to attend a class. All winners received national and local publicity.

The annual competition, which focuses on furthering the understanding, knowledge and function of lighting as a primary element in design, requires the primary and predominant use of Cooper Lighting products. Cooper Lighting has held this competition since 1977.

Entries are judged on the blending of aesthetics, creative achievement, technical performance and the degree in which the lighting met the project constraints and design concept goals.

DOE Updates High-Efficiency Parking Structure Lighting Specification

Dept. of EnergyA CBEA Project Team has updated the High-Efficiency Parking Structure Lighting Specification. First released in 2009, version 1.1, released on February 15, 2012, has updates related to IES TM-21 and anticipated RP-20 requirements. In addition to focusing on the efficiency of each of these technologies, the Project Team investigated how the role of controls and the specific use of each technology can lead to even greater energy savings. The maximum allowed installed power density within the specification is 40% below ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2007. Additional energy savings are possible from the use of lighting controls and daylighting.

Questions on this specification should be sent to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at CBEA@pnnl.gov.

North American Manufacturers Form Consortium for Solar Lighting

Consortium for Solar LightingFour manufacturers recently founded the Consortium for Solar Lighting (CSL). The CSL’s founding members are Sharp Electronics Corporation, Carmanah Technologies Corporation, Inovus Solar, Inc., and SolarOne Solutions, Inc.

The mission of this group is to accelerate the adoption of reliable solar lighting technology through the development of universal specifications intended to support customers’ fair and comprehensive evaluation of commercial-scale lighting systems. In the process, the group expects that these specifications will foster awareness of solar powered lighting and the applications where it is a viable alternative to conventional grid-connected lighting technology.

The group is focused on assessment of the energy balance of a system design to ensure operation that is aligned with customer’s expectations. Other aspects of the system design, including standards that apply to individual components of the system, lighting characteristics or aspects that relate to safety are already being addressed through national and international bodies such as Commission International D’eclairage (CIE), Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), International Electrotechniques Commission (IEC) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

The first milestone of the of group is to develop common terminology and key metrics presented in a consistent, user-friendly form that can be readily adopted by municipal, government and commercial customers and specifiers. A white paper on this topic, “Solar Lighting Recommended Practices: System Sizing – Preliminary Version” is scheduled for release on June 15, 2011. An introductory flyer about the Consortium and its mission will be available during the 2011 LightFair in Philadelphia, PA on May 17-19, 2011 at the booths of the respective members as well as through their corporate websites. The founding members invite other North American solar powered lighting manufacturers who are able to commit time and resources to join them in establishing a formal organization to pursue the CSL’s mission.

To inquire about participation in the CSL please contact info@consortiumforsolarlighting.com

LumenOptix Acquires Westinghouse Lighting Solutions

LumenOptix, LLC has acquired the assets of Global Industrial Lighting Solutions, which was also known as Westinghouse Lighting Solutions. LumenOptix will continue to leverage precision optics and superior designs to manufacture the most energy-efficient-lighting fixtures in the industry. The transition of assets which includes inventory, equipment and personnel, will be coordinated to ensure consistent service to customers. The LumenOptix team will continue to operate in the Westinghouse Lighting Solutions facility until the transition is complete in June, 2011.

OSRAM Opto Semiconductors Expands

Opto Semiconductors will step up its production output by converting its two chip manufacturing facilities to 6-inch wafers while expanding production at both plants. A new production building is currently under construction in Penang, Malaysia, while in Regensburg, Germany, the existing space is being reallocated. The two facilities will each be converting to the new manufacturing technology, introducing 6-inch wafers to replace the current 4-inch wafers. These measures are expected to almost double the chip production capacity for white LEDs by the end of 2012.

The capacity expansion will primarily affect InGaN chips employing thin-film and UX:3 technology, which are required in the production of white LEDs. In the new production facilities, these chips will be manufactured on 6-inch wafers from the start and no longer on wafers with a 4-inch diameter.

With this move, OSRAM Opto Semiconductors is positioning itself to capitalize on the growth  of international LED markets. When this expansion is complete, the Penang chip manufacturing plant will have approximately 25,000 sqm (269,000 sq. ft.) and employ 400 more workers. No additional space is being created at the Regensburg plant. Instead, the production facilities are being switched over to LED production and may be operational as early as the summer of 2011.

Lutron Electronics Opens New York Global Specification Office

LUTRONLight control manufacturer Lutron Electronics has opened a New York global specification office. The new 2,300 square-foot specification office is at 1 Penn Plaza, Suite 1714, New York, NY 10119.

The New York facility features a diverse line of Lutron light control products presented in an innovative and versatile commercial office. The space includes an open office mock-up, a private office and a conference room. The specification office provides visitors with the opportunity explore a wide variety of product applications, including control of high-efficacy lighting sources, sustainable light control options and daylight harvesting strategies.

Lutron specification offices throughout the world offer commercial support for architects, specifiers, engineers, energy managers, system designers and their clients. The New York, NY location joins the company’s many global specification offices including Toronto, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore, Dubai, London, Sao Paolo, Shanghai and Chihuahua.

East Cleveland On the Road to Savings With NE Ohio’s First Major LED Street Lighting Installation

LED LIghting in East Cleveland, OHThe City of East Cleveland is decreasing energy costs by replacing 45 standard-technology municipal street lights with LED roadway street lights. The project grows out of a long partnership between GE Lighting and East Cleveland, which has been the home of the unit’s headquarters for close to 100 years. A one-mile block along Noble Road serves as a demonstration to other municipalities of the benefits of a higher-efficiency lighting system.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories predicts that LED lights reduce energy needs by more than 50 percent and maintenance costs by more than 80 percent compared to traditional lights. It’s estimated that the new LED street lights will reduce the city’s energy use by 28 million watts a year.

Mayor Norton said that the LED street lights give city residents the enhanced security associated with this high-performance lighting system. The system shines a bright, more uniform light across the entire area it illuminates, versus spotty, hot spots of light typical of certain other lighting technologies used in roadway lighting. Even with less lumens, or light level, compared to a high-intensity discharge street lighting system, the LED system better directs the light to where it is needed due to its advanced optics. The LED street lighting system is more precisely focused, which reduces light pollution and limits glare.

Earlier this year, GE Lighting and its LED unit, GE Lighting Solutions, earned more awards than any other company in the 2010 Next Generation Luminaires™ (NGL) Competition, including a Best-in-Class award for the GE Evolve™ LED street lighting system. GE LED lighting products for refrigerated display, architectural and outdoor applications were also recognized in the competition. The event is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America and the International Association of Lighting Designers for “excellence in the design of energy-efficient LED luminaries for general illumination lighting.” A global industry leader, GE Lighting has provided more than 20 million feet of LED signage and architectural lighting around the world and installed over six million LED traffic and rail signals globally. GE has the world’s largest installed base of LED refrigerated display lighting in the world – a category the company invented.

GE, Lithonia Lighting want better school lighting

GE Lighting, Cleveland and Lithonia Lighting, Atlanta, have combined efforts to help schools improve their classroom lighting quality and cut energy costs by as much as 50%. The information-delivery vehicle for this new effort is a website at www.BetterLightingBetterSchools.com.
   According to the press release: “Better quality, more controllable and efficient lighting is an investment that ought to be on the radar screens of school districts across the U.S. this year. Superintendents, business managers, and school boards can take a meaningful step toward extraordinary, lasting lighting energy savings—and improved, more flexible learning environments—by visiting www.BetterLightingBetterSchools.com.”

GE and Lithonia's www.BetterLightingBetterSchools.com website is a new resource aimed at helping schools improve lighting and cut energy costs.

   The site provides a spectrum of information about how schools can improve lighting energy efficiency. It features a lighting audit request form tied to the introduction of energy-efficient Class Pack Lighting Systems from GE Lighting and Lithonia Lighting. By installing Class Pack Lighting Systems, schools can reduce annual lighting-related energy costs as much as 50%.
   “We want to help school districts across the country understand the significant opportunity that today’s energy-efficient lighting systems can provide,” said Jason Raak, a marketing manager with GE’s lighting business. “Recent new product advancements make current high-performance lighting far superior to systems installed just five years ago, and payback periods are shorter than ever.”
   Qualified school representatives can use www.BetterLightingBetterSchools.com to request a school or district-wide energy audit (restrictions apply). Visitors to the site will see a host of supporting statistics and details on how school executives can reduce the cost to renovate facilities by using NEMA premium ballasts and CEE qualified HPT8 lamps which, in many regions, can defray initial costs through utility rebate eligibility.
   The Class Pack Lighting Systems combine high-light-output, full-spectrum fluorescent lighting with a ballast system that delivers customized lighting levels on a two-lamp platform. With fewer, longer-life components, it minimizes maintenance and lamp replacement costs. It’s designed for fast, easy installation after school is out for the day or during summer renovations.
   “We think BetterLightingBetterSchools.com provides school districts with many of the resources needed to make smart financial decisions about lighting and energy savings,” said Monik Mehra, director of marketing, Lithonia Lighting. “It’s a vital tool at a time when school districts have to do more with less, while striving to improve the quality of their students’ learning experience.”—Gary L. Parr

A new idea in LED lighting


Redwood Systems launched its network-based technology for LED lighting and building-performance systems in March. The new technology  is based on the idea that LED lighting presents opportunity to create a unified network-based digital platform for smart buildings, helping building owners and designers reduce energy costs while providing control and automation in commercial lighting never before possible.
   At Lightfair last week, Commercial Building Products asked executive Jeremy Stieglitz to demonstrate the product. By combining three typically discrete systems (power, communications, sensors) into one low-voltage networked system, Redwood says its platform “will make smart buildings vastly simpler, easier, and lower cost to own and operate.”
   Redwood Systems’ CEO is Dave Leonard,  formerly general manager of Cisco’s Ethernet Switching Business Unit. Mark Covaro, Redwood’s CTO, is the former principal power design engineer for Cisco’s widely deployed power-over-Ethernet platform.
   “Redwood’s vision is to use LED lighting’s low voltage to power not just lighting, but create a digital network to manage and efficiently optimize lighting, heating, venting, air conditioning, plug loads, window shading, and just about everything else that uses power in a building,” said Leonard. “Using a network-based platform approach, we will deliver smart lighting systems that revolutionize how lights, and buildings, are powered, controlled, and optimized.” —Jim Carper