Commercial Conversation podcasts

Commercial Conversation is a new podcast series from the editors of Commercial Building Products. Twice monthly we will post a podcast in which editorial director Gary Parr discusses commercial-construction issues with industry experts. Two podcasts are now available for listening:

Schott shows off its glass

At the AIA Nat’l Convention, held June 10 to 12 in Miami, Schott North America Inc., Elmsford, NY, introduced RestrictView, a glass product designed for buildings in which privacy is a priority. The security glass is designed to prevent viewing through two pieces of glass but permit viewing through one piece. In other words, a viewer can see an object or person in a room when looking through one pane of RestrictView, but cannot see through the RestrictView glass on the other side of the room.
   For example, in a hospital, patients can see nurses or attendants in the corridor through windows in their rooms, and the nurses can see the patients. Patients, however, cannot see across the corridor into the room of another patient. In a courtyard application, people can see into the courtyard, but cannot see through to viewers on the other side. Adjoining treatment rooms or conference rooms are only viewable from corridors.
   RestrictView glass is a laminate and can be manufactured in a variety of formats, including approved attack-specification formats for psychiatric hospitals and prisons. A 3/16-in.-thick laminate consists of:

  • 4 mm Schott Amiran anti-reflective glass
  • 0.76 mm polyurethane with an RV interlayer
  • 4 mm of Amiran anti-reflective glass

   The glass weighs 4.68 lb./ft2 and is available with maximum dimensions of 44 x 44 in. The glass is designed for hospital, hotel, commercial, or security applications.
   At the show, Schott also announced that its fire-rated Pyran glass-ceramic glass recently received “Cradle-to-Cradle” certification. According to the company, “‘Cradle to Cradle’ certifies that Pyran is produced in an environmentally preferable way and qualifies it as the only environmentally friendly, fire-rated glass-ceramic on the market. It will be the only fire-rated glass option to help architects and designers qualify for LEED certification.”—Gary L. Parr