Sustainability in the Desert: Video Case Study Offers CE Credit for Architects

Health Sciences Education Building (HSEB) at The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix uses nearly 6,000 copper panels and more than 10,000 copper parts.

Health Sciences Education Building (HSEB) at The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix uses nearly 6,000 copper panels and more than 10,000 copper parts.

Inspired by its surrounding southwestern landscape, the Health Sciences Education Building (HSEB) at The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix is one of the most innovative construction projects in the United States utilizing predominately recycled copper. Using nearly 6,000 copper panels and more than 10,000 copper parts, this 268,000 square-foot building consists of six stories of administration and faculty offices, lecture halls, learning studios, flexible classrooms, clinical suites, gross anatomy facilities, laboratories and conference rooms.

The Copper Development Association (CDA), in conjunction with GreenCE, has developed a two-part video case study which further highlights the building materials and craftsmanship of the HSEB project, and the design philosophy and strategy behind the sustainable design and construction of this state-of-the-art facility. Both hour-long videos are registered with the USGBC for continuing education credits and with the American Institute of Architects (AIA), which requires architects to pursue continuing education to maintain their accreditation.

Part one of the case study articulates how the selection and development of a building’s site can support the health of the surrounding community and identifies the positive outcomes of using the Integrated Design Process encouraged by LEED Certification.  Architects can register for the free online course on the GreenCE website. Part two is also available, here.

Using 26 different copper panels arranged in multiple combinations, the designers were able to create an abstract pattern that represented the surrounding desert landscape, bringing the project’s vision to life. “If you look, a lot of the views around here are of the mountains that surround Phoenix. We wanted the color and the striations [of the building] to relate to those mountains,” Paul Zajen, Design Principal for CO Architects, states in the video. “We realized we could get that with copper.””

In addition to its aesthetic appeal, the extensive copper-cladding provides the HSEB with a skin most suitable for the desert climate. With Phoenix temperatures reaching as high as 115 degrees Fahrenheit, copper is an attractive alternative to steel due to its ability to quickly reject heat. Its copper-clad exterior literally serves as a shield protecting the building interior from direct solar exposure. Adapting rainscreen technology, the building’s engineers took a system typically used in the northwest and created a way to use copper cladding as a sunscreen to keep excessive heat out of the HSEB. Completed in August 2012, the HSEB project is targeting LEED Silver certification for new construction.

Students at the University of Arizona and Northern University Arizona will be using the Health Sciences Education Building for various programs. The new facility will serve as a training ground for 1,200 medical professionals each year.

Video Case Study Offers CE Credit for Architects

Copper Development AssnInspired by its surrounding southwestern landscape, the Health Sciences Education Building (HSEB) at The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix is one of the most innovative construction projects in the United States utilizing predominately recycled copper. Using nearly 6,000 copper panels and more than 10,000 copper parts, this 268,000 square-foot building consists of six stories of administration and faculty offices, lecture halls, learning studios, flexible classrooms, clinical suites, gross anatomy facilities, laboratories and conference rooms.

The Copper Development Association (CDA), in conjunction with GreenCE, has developed a two-part video case study which further highlights the building materials and craftsmanship of the HSEB project, and the design philosophy and strategy behind the sustainable design and construction of this state-of-the-art facility. Both hour-long videos are registered with the USGBC for continuing education credits and with the American Institute of Architects (AIA), which requires architects to pursue continuing education to maintain their accreditation.

Part one of the case study articulates how the selection and development of a building’s site can support the health of the surrounding community and identifies the positive outcomes of using the Integrated Design Process encouraged by LEED Certification. Architects can register for the free online course on the GreenCE website.

Using 26 different copper panels arranged in multiple combinations, the designers were able to create an abstract pattern that represented the surrounding desert landscape, bringing the project’s vision to life. “If you look, a lot of the views around here are of the mountains that surround Phoenix. We wanted the color and the striations [of the building] to relate to those mountains,” Paul Zajen, Design Principal for CO Architects, states in the video. “We realized we could get that with copper.”

In addition to its aesthetic appeal, the copper-cladding provides the HSEB with a skin suitable for the desert climate. With Phoenix temperatures reaching as high as 115 degrees Fahrenheit, copper is an attractive alternative to steel due to its ability to quickly reject heat. Its copper-clad exterior literally serves as a shield protecting the building interior from direct solar exposure. Adapting rainscreen technology, the building’s engineers took a system typically used in the northwest and created a way to use copper cladding as a sunscreen to keep excessive heat out of the HSEB. Completed in August 2012, the HSEB project is targeting LEED Silver certification for new construction.

Students at the University of Arizona and Northern University Arizona will be using the Health Sciences Education Building for various programs. The new facility will serve as a training ground for 1,200 medical professionals each year.

Ronald McDonald House shows how to kill bacteria

Copper Development Assnnizations that participated in this retrofit included Olin Brass, Rocky Mountain Hardware, Colonial Bronze, Elkay Manufacturing, Frigo Design, R&B Wagner Inc., ANDY OnCall, StairCrafters Inc., Nurture by Steelcase and the South Carolina Research Authority.

The Medical University of South Carolina measured the amount of bacteria on the previous touch surfaces prior to the copper retrofit and is in the process of measuring them again. A reports scheduled for release in the third quarter of 2012 will compare the two sets of measurements.

Initial discussions about the project began in 2010, and the Antimicrobial Copper installations started in the third quarter of 2011. The facility remained open throughout the retrofit project, allowing RMHC to continue providing much-needed services with limited disruption.

For more information about antimicrobial copper, an application of the Copper Development Association, and to view a complete listing of EPA-approved public health claims, please visit the Copper Development Association website.

Copper lining protects one-of-a-kind MRI machine

Copper Development AssociationIf you’ve ever needed medical treatment for a severely sprained limb or been hampered by back pain, most likely you’ve undergone Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or as it’s more commonly referred to as an MRI. An MRI uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the body, specifically contrasts between soft tissues of the body like tendons and muscles.

For accurate imaging and diagnosis, any potential source of interference to the MRI process must be eliminated. Patients being screened or imaged must remove all jewelry and metal objects. Further, the room that houses the MRI machine must be lined with copper or steel for magnetic shielding.

The Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Portland, Oregon is home to one of the most advanced MRI systems in the world and they have it placed in a room entirely encased in copper.

The advanced neurosurgical imaging system is called an “IMRISneuro.” The unit is housed within a fully integrated operating room with a truly one-of-a-kind movable MRI. This technology allows surgeons to safely capture images of patients undergoing complicated procedures such as brain surgery, directly in the operating room, providing real-time guidance and feedback for more precise results and better patient outcomes.

“IMRIS MR Imaging System leverages all of the diagnostic functionality of the MRI technology and combines it with the unique patented IMRIS technology, which transports and controls the MRI to clinical imaging locations,” said IMRIS director of customer engineering & program management, Hong Yu. “The system provides the surgeon with high resolution, timely images for use in surgical planning, intra-operative assessment, and post-operative evaluation.”

But all that makes this new technique successful can’t be seen with the naked eye. Hidden behind the walls, floor and ceiling of the room housing the MRI is over 1 million square inches of copper sheet, and approximately 15,000 feet of soldered joints. This hidden, yet vital copper system provides electromagnetic shielding, also known as RF shielding, which is required for optimum MRI image quality.

Copper’s ability to block radio waves, makes it ideal for smaller, but no less vital applications in the MRI room. The metal is also being used to shroud electron tubes, transistors and integrated circuits to prevent radio frequency interference.

“There is less magnetic pull force with copper than with other metals, particularly in the floor,” Yu said. “Copper is also a better conductor and shielding material.”

This particular type of MRI is not only rare for the west coast, or even the United States. Providence St. Vincent is only one of 16 in the world to have such a setup for this type of MRI, and allows foreign medical teams to come in and observe and train in the medical suite.

For such an important location for the medical world, it’s only proper that it is encompassed by mankind’s oldest and most reliable metal.

To learn more about copper and its use in making today’s buildings more effective, more efficient and more durable, please visit the Copper Development Association website.

Copper Industry Launches New DIY Videos

Copper Development Assn.The “Do It Proper with Copper” video series is back with its second installment of DIY architectural and plumbing how-to videos. These short, instructional videos illustrate exactly how to use this versatile metal in plumbing, architecture and building and construction projects.

The new series covers building techniques such as: vertical lap seams, flat seams and standing seams for architectural copper systems and; bending & flaring, structural adhesives and a continuation of brazing techniques used in plumbing applications.

Each video explains which tools are needed for the application, while giving a step-by-step tutorial that is easy to understand for anyone from the average do-it-yourselfer to the seasoned professional. The videos break down the different copper methods, and make sure no small details are overlooked. For example, the standing seam video not only discusses how the seam is constructed, but also how cleats should be used to attach the sheet copper to the substrate of the roof or wall.

The Do it Proper with Copper video series is available for free download on the Copper Development Association website, and are also featured on the CDA’s YouTube channel. The CDA is the information, education, market and technical development arm of the copper, brass and bronze industries in the USA.