E-book version of NBIMS-US available for $5

Natl Inst of Building ScienceThe National Institute of Building Sciences buildingSMART alliance has officially released the e-book version of the National BIM Standard-United States® (NBIMS-US™) Version 2 (V2), the first-ever consensus-based standard governing building information modeling (BIM) for use in the United States. It was first released in spring 2012 as a free, online standard. With this new release as an eBook, the Alliance helps the NBIMS-US V2 advance the art and science of the building life cycle by making the standard that much easier to reference anywhere, anytime.

Developed in response to requests for an off-line and portable form of the standard, the eBook contains the fixed content of the NBIMS-US™ V2, as well as internet-accessible links to reference supporting material online. NBIMS-US™ V2 covers the full life cycle of buildings—from planning, design and construction to operations and sustainment. Part of an international effort, the standard is serving as the kick-off point for a number of other countries around the world to adopt as their own BIM standard, as well as the basis of NBIMS-US™  V3, which is currently under development here in the United States.

The standard is arranged into three main categories: reference standards, information exchange standards (which are built upon the reference standards) and best practice guidelines that support users in their implementation of open BIM standards-based deliverables.

The Alliance, which is both a council of the Institute and the North American chapter of buildingSMART® International, is working with several other nations on BIM standard development. The United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Korea, Australia and New Zealand are all using the NBIMS-US™ V2 as the basis for their own standards. The NBIMS-US™ V2 eBook is compatible with MAC and PC devices, Android Tablets, Kindle and Nook eReaders, and related formats. The application is available online through the Institute Store for just $4.99. Download the NBIMS-US™ V2 eBook now.

Architects Get the Skills They Need at BIM Camp

Open BIMBIM Camp is a one-day event to be held on Thursday, January 24, 2013 from 12:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. EST at the District Architecture Center, AIA DC, 421 7th St. NW, Washington, DC 20004.

At BIM Camp, architects and landscape architects will learn the skills they need to successfully implement Building Information Modeling (BIM) workflows into their practices, better understand how IFC-based standards benefit design teams, create sustainable and high-performing designs, and collaborate through Open BIM.

Transitioning to BIM has a reputation for being daunting, frustrating, time-consuming and expensive. So when clients put pressure on architects to adopt BIM workflows, jumping in probably isn’t their first reaction. BIM Camp will teach attendees how easy adopting a BIM workflow can be.

BIM Camp teaches the skills architects need to thrive in this new world of BIM. Attendees also receive a BIM Survival Kit, loaded with presentation materials and other resources. Plus, attendees can earn 4 AIA/CES/HSW or LA CES PDH. And, all registration fees will fund the Vectorworks Young Architects Student Scholarship to be awarded later this year!

The cost is just $25 for students or members of AIA, NOMA, Vectorworks Service Select and $40 for non-members. To view the agenda and to register, go to http://www.eventbrite.com/event/5017326960/pr#

For more information, send an email to BIMcamp@vectorworks.net or call 888-646-4223.

New Research Shows Dramatic Increase in Use of Building Information Modeling (BIM) in North America

McGraw-Hill ConstructionMcGraw-Hill Construction recently presented highlights of its new research showing the rapid advance of Building Information Modeling (BIM) usage by architects, engineers, contractors and owners in North America. Comparing results from its similar research in 2007 and 2009, McGraw-Hill Construction finds:

  • The percentage of companies using BIM jumped from 17% in 2007, to 49% in 2009, to 71% in 2012;
  • For the first time ever, more contractors (74%) are using BIM than architects (70%);
  • All users report increased business benefits from BIM including better profits, more accurate documentation, less rework, reduced project duration, fewer claims and the ability to offer new services;
  • Almost 40% of BIM users are heavily committed to it, doing over 60% of their work in BIM. This group has surged by 44% since 2009;
  • As a sign of its increasing acceptance and maturity, almost half (49%) of BIM users have five or more years experience using it.

The full results of this research will appear in The Business Value of BIM in North America SmartMarket Report, part of the continuing McGraw-Hill Construction SmartMarket Report series and released to the general public at the end of November 2012. The premier partner of the research is Autodesk, with corporate partner Parsons. Other contributing sponsors include Barton Malow, buildingSMART alliance, Charles Pankow Foundation, Hensel-Phelps, HOK, Mortenson Construction, NRI, Pinnacle Infotech, and Satterfield & Pontikes.

Changes Could Streamline How Industry Uses BIM

Building Smart AllianceFollowing an 86-day open ballot submission period, the National Institute of Building Sciences buildingSMART alliance has closed the submission period to develop Version 2 of its building information modeling (BIM) standard, the National BIM Standard-United StatesTM (NBIMS-US). The Alliance received 45 submissions, which cover a range of topics that could have a significant impact on the way architectural, engineering and construction professionals use BIM.

The ballots were separated into categories relating to: reference standards; information exchanges, including model view definitions (MVDs) and information delivery manuals (IDMs); best practices; and overview and guidelines, including updates to the NBIMS Version 1, Part 1. Of the ballot submissions, 36 were complete entries and nine were “blue sky submissions,” or ideas that will need more input before becoming a ballot or going for a vote to be included in the standard.

Several of the ballot submissions, if approved by the voting membership, will significantly expand the current standard. For example:

  • A number of ballots identified tables from OmniClass to be used as referenced standards, including: Table 13 – Spaces by Function; Table 21 – Elements (Uniformat); Table 22 – Work Results (Masterformat), Table 23 – Products; Table 32 – Services; and Table 36 – Information Content. Much of the open BIM coordination in the industry is based on these tables and their coding structure.
  • Ballots proposed the addition of several information exchanges into the NBIMS. One of primary interest is the Construction Operations Building information exchange (COBie), which, if approved, would become an official standard through this consensus process.
  • One ballot would add the BIM Project Execution Planning Guide, Version 2.1, updated in May 2011, to the NBIMS. This guide has been used by numerous organizations across the industry to coordinate BIM implementation.

The ballot item comment period begins August 3 and ends September 1. All members of the industry, including architects and engineers using the software; contractors interpreting the data being provided through the BIM; and software vendors developing BIM tools, may submit comments during the comment period upon becoming a member of the Project Committee. Comments will be shared with the Project Committee; eligible members will begin voting on the ballots September 21. View a list of all ballots. Download a Project Committee application form.

McGraw-Hill Report Shows That Europeans Have Been Using BIM Longer, But Adoption is Greater in North America

BIM in EuropeA little over a third (36%) of Western European construction professionals are now using Building Information Modeling (BIM), according to McGraw-Hill Construction’s latest SmartMarket Report, The Business Value of BIM in Europe.

Produced in collaboration with Autodesk, the National Institute of Building Sciences/buildingSMART alliance, and 11 industry associations in Europe, and released today, the first-ever report compares BIM adoption rates in France, Germany and the U.K. with those in North America, where 49% of contractors, architects and engineers report BIM usage, according to McGraw-Hill Construction’s 2009 report, The Business Value of BIM.

McGraw-Hill Construction’s new report reveals meaningful differences between the North American and European BIM markets and further affirms that firms with greater experience and expertise in BIM frequently achieve a significant return on their BIM investment. Over a third of Western European BIM users (34%) have more than five years of experience using BIM, versus only 18% in North America; and nearly three-quarters of Western European BIM users (74%) report a positive perceived return on their overall investment in BIM, compared with 63% of North American BIM users.

Users in Western Europe and North America agree that interoperability of software used by team members is an important factor in determining BIM’s overall value on construction projects. To download the free report, visit McGraw-Hill Construction website.