Commercial carpet fiber combines renewable & recycled content

Antron Lumena solution-dyed nylon, with TruBlend fiber technology, is the first carpet fiber to combine recycled and renewable content. in a single fiber offering

INVISTA, Kennesaw, GA,  announced, today, a new carpet fiber innovation. Antron Lumena solution-dyed nylon, with TruBlend fiber technology, is said to be the first carpet fiber to combine recycled and renewable content in a single fiber offering. This fiber combines as much as 25% pre-consumer and post-consumer recycled content with as much as 5% bio-based content derived from castor beans, a high-yield and renewable resource.
   “Antron Lumena solution-dyed nylon with TruBlend fiber technology delivers a balance of recycled and renewable ingredients for today while anticipating innovative blends for tomorrow,” said Diane O’Sullivan, global marketing director of INVISTA’s commercial flooring segment.  “The TruBlend fiber technology product line allows us to introduce new blends over time as technology changes and new innovations and resources are available.  This is another step toward introducing products that strive to change the conversation from one focused just on single-product ingredients to one that includes a balance of resources and understanding the cycle of our products.”
   InterfaceFLOR, LaGrange, GA, will showcase new products that feature TruBlend fiber technology at the NeoCon show, June 14 to 16, Chicago. Due to its unique composition, the fiber is the only commercial solution-dyed nylon carpet fiber that can contribute to both the Rapidly Renewable and the Recycle Content Credits for LEED projects. It can contribute to LEED MR Credits 4.1 and 4.2, MR Credit 6, and may contribute to an Innovation in Design Credit.
   TruBlend fiber technology is currently available in seven colors of Antron Lumena solution-dyed nylon: Granite, Fawn, Mushroom, Antique Olive, Gingerbread, Glacier, and Graphite.  All Antron Lumena nylon colors are held to the same high end-use performance standards and are tested in heat-set form for stain resistance, bleed resistance, color fastness to light and atmospheric contaminants, household bleach resistance, and resistance to crocking.—Gary L. Parr

Cool thing at Lightfair: WAC’s OLED chandelier

WAC Lighting's SOL OLED chandelier.

What did I see at Lightfair that was new? Though there’s one day left, the most intriguing product so far is the SOL OLED (organic LED) chandelier being shown by WAC Lighting, Garden City, NY.
   The chandelier features ORBEOS OLED Lighting from OSRAM Opto Semiconductors, Sunnyvale, CA. The circular satellite OLED panels rotate up, for indirect lighting, or tilt down to comfortably illuminate the surface below, or faces around a table. A central downlight also provides supplemental lighting on a tabletop.
   Exceptionally thin (2.1 millimeters), the OLED panels distribute quality light with solid color rendering (CRI 75) and a warm color temperature (2800K). ORBEOS panels are fully dimmable and deliver a uniform area of glare-free light. The SOL chandelier is crafted of aluminum and finished in black nickel. It is 18.5 inches in diameter and 2.2 inches tall.
   “SOL, our new decorative chandelier, is our first complete OLED fixture introduction,” said Shelley Wang, president of WAC Lighting. “We believe that the inconceivably thin, curved planes of the complete design, and the incorporated glare-free adjustable organic LED panels, will capture considerable attention.”
   Soft light from the ORBEOS panels is incorporated into the design and requires no additional light control from lenses or reflectors that traditionally result in a 10% to 40% loss in efficiency. ORBEOS light panels achieve energy efficiency without the use of heavy metals or other rare-earth materials commonly used in other energy-efficient sources. The OLEDs are made of layers of carbon-based materials that self-illuminate in various colors when energized, without having an impact on the environment.—Gary L. Parr

The sights and lights of Spain

Last month, I attended the Cevisama tile show in Valencia, Spain. In addition to looking at Spanish ceramic tile, I photographed some interesting light fixtures there and in Granada. Enjoy. — Jim Carper

Hotel Palacio de los Patos, Granada, Spain

Hotel Palacio de los Patos, Granada, Spain

Chandelier in a Cevisama booth

Chandelier in a Cevisama booth

Street lamp, Granada, Spain

Street lamp, Granada, Spain

Library in the Andalucia Museum of Memory, Granada

Library in the Andalucia Museum of Memory, Granada

Credit crisis

YHR Partners, Moorhead, MN, was the design architect for St. Anne Catholic Church, Barrington, IL.

YHR Partners, Moorhead, MN, was the design architect for St. Anne Cathlolic Church, Barrington, IL.

This photo of St. Anne Catholic Church, Barrington, IL, appeared in the November/December 2009 Commercial Building Products magazine, courtesy of RuckPate, the architect of record.
We since learned that YHR Partners, Moorehead, MN, was the design architect responsible for the layout of the spaces, finish selection, and the ceiling design. What’s notable about the ceiling is that the pattern is printed on fabric and glued to the substrate. Seen from the pews, the pattern appears to be hand painted. James Simpson is principal of YHR Partners. We want to give credit where credit is due.
In case you missed the issue, we showed eight ceiling treatments in all. See “Ceilings Define Spaces.” Jim Carper

A fish tale

Exterior of Rock 'n Fish restaurant at the LA Live entertainment complex in Los Angeles

Rock ‘n roll I get. Same deal with fish ‘n chips. But Rock ‘n Fish? As the name of a restaurant? When a press release crossed my desk (e-mail inbox, actually) about Rock ‘n Fish, and I said, “OK, I’ll take the bait” (so to speak). I opened up the message and looked at the jpegs. The light fixtures grabbed me. I was hooked.
Rock ‘n Fish is a restaurant at the L.A. Live Entertainment Campus in Los Angeles. The 5.6-million-square-foot mixed-use development is on 27 acres, covering more than six blocks in the city’s South Park district. The Art Deco-style complex includes broadcast studios, restaurants, cafes, cinemas, bowling lanes, music clubs, and a music museum.
For his fine-dining restaurant, owner Michael Zislis wanted to match the architecture of L.A. Live. Zislis and designer Larry Drasin of Beverly Hills created their own intepretation of Art Deco inside Rock ‘n Fish. Toward that end, they wanted one-of-a-kind lighting fixtures.
“We had a preliminary design completed,” Drasin said. “But we counted on the expertise and experience of Sunset Design to take our artistic ideas and make the work as lighting.”
Sunset Designs, South El Monte, CA, works in most media, including crystal, silk, and metal (brass, copper, stainless steel, aluminum, wrought iron and many more).

dining-room at Rock 'n Fish LA Live entertainment complex. Lighting fixture designed an manufactured by Sunset Designs South El Monte CA

“We gave them the working drawings and they engineered the fabrication. It was a piece of cake,” Zislis said.
That would be “crabcake,” I assume. —Jim Carper 
 

pendant

fixture

Rockin’ the prairie

Jumers_ring_172bRock Island, IL, isn’t on my radar. Though it and I are both in the Land of Lincoln, it’s out west, on the Mississippi River, while I’m east, in Chicago, on Lake Michigan. When I do think of my fellow Prairie State metropolis, it’s along the lines of Quad Cities or Rock Island Railroad, not high-stakes gambling.
Then a press release crossed my desk about Jumer’s Casino & Hotel in that fair city. The $151 million complex consists of a 170,000-sq.-ft. casino/entertainment center, and a five-story, 205-room hotel. It opened in December 2008. The photos are stunning. The casino changes colors in broad daylight, according to the release, because the aluminum-composite material (ACM) skin changes colors as different wavelengths of light are reflected back to the viewer’s eye.
“With each shift of the sun and clouds, it changes color, from red to orange to almost brown,” said Guy Davidson, KKE Jumers_exterior_047bArchitects, Minneapolis.
Jumer’s is clad in two colors of Alucobond ACM—Spectra Cupral and Texas Copper. Alcan Composites USA, Mooresville, NC, makes the product, which consists of two sheets of 0.02-inch-thick aluminum thermobonded to a plastic core. General contractor was Kraus-Anderson Construction, Minneapolis. M.G. McGrath Architectural Sheet Metal, Maplewood, MN, and SGH, Omaha, NE, installed the material.
Jumers_logo_119b

I feel a road trip coming on.Jim Carper

Two to tango: Indelval and Salto

CBC Flooring, Commack, NY, has tapped South America and Europe for inspiration. The company is now the exclusive North American source of Indelval brand rubber flooring from Argentina.
And it launched a brand of its own, called Salto Exceptional Flooring. (In Italian, “salto” means to jump or to leap. “The Salto brand is characterized by leaping into the future or forward thinking in the commercial flooring industry,” a company executive said.)
Indelval products are made with a high content of natural rubber harvested directly from rubber trees. The flooring is free of PVCs, plasticizers, halogens, formaldehydes, heavy metals, and asbestos.

The flooring is free of PVCs, plasticizers, halogens, formaldehydes, heavy metals, and asbestos.

The flooring is free of PVCs, plasticizers, halogens, formaldehydes, heavy metals, and asbestos.

Rubber flooring is often spec’d for sanitary flooring in laboratories, clinics and hospitals; for conductive flooring when there is a need to control electrostatic discharges; for installations where heavy traffic requires a durable floor; for transport flooring for buses and trains; and as sports flooring, including glueless interlocking options.
Indelval-lobby
The product has a good green story: the color pigments are eco-friendly, the manufacturer recycles waste from the manufacturing process, and  it uses only recyclable packaging materials.
The company says the products and installation systems will contribute to a number of LEED credits, including Materials and Resources Recycled Content 4.1 and 4.2, Reuse 3.1 and 3.2 and IEQ Credit 4.1 and 4.3 for indoor air quality.
The Salto brand “is designed to satisfy unmet market demands, irrespective of material,” said Jeff Collum, CBC’s director of flooring.
Unica, the first product in the line, is a recycled 18-inch by 18-inch limestone tile with 80% recycled content: 10% post-consumer and 70% pre-consumer recycled content. No two tiles look exactly the same. They are available in 28 colorways.
CBC says Unica is California Section 1350 compliant, the basis for many indoor air-quality certifications. The tile and installation system contribute to LEED credits, including Materials and Resources Recycled Content 4.1 and 4.2, Reuse 3.1; and IEQ Credit 4.1 and 4.3 for indoor air quality.
The product is so new that photos are not yet available. I had thought about hiring some paparazzi to stake out the factory and grab some shots. But the budget choice was paying for pix or attending Greenbuild. I’ll see you in Phoenix. Ciao. Jim Carper

Do good interiors, get recognized

There is nothing like a pat on the back and a plaque on the wall as recognition for good work. If you do ceilings and/or interiors, the Ceiling & Interior Systems Construction Association (CISCA), St. Charles, IL, would like a chance to recognize that work through its 2009 Construction Excellence Awards competition. All entries must be received by CISCA no later than January 15, 2010. Download the entry information pdf here.
According to the organization press release, “CISCA’s Construction Excellence Awards recognize outstanding achievements in the design, fabrication, and functionality of acoustical and specialty ceilings, as well as in interior systems construction. The Awards also further the contributions of ceiling and interior systems professionals to the architectural and construction industries of which their work is an essential and integral part.”
If you have a winning entry, you will be recognized at the Awards and Keynote Breakfast on Friday, April 23, 2010, during CISCA’s 2010 Convention and INTEX Trade Show, to be held April 21 to 24, 2010 in Denver. The awards ceremony features a comprehensive multi-media presentation of all submissions and winning projects.
Award categories include:

  • Ceilings: Complex or difficult design new construction ceiling projects using metal, wood, fiberglass, fabric, or mineral fiber.
  • Renovation: Complex or difficult design renovation projects using metal, wood, fiberglass, fabric, or mineral fiber.
  • Interior Finishes: Complex or difficult design interior finish projects.
  • Acoustical Solutions: Complex or difficult design projects solving an acoustical challenge.
  • Boutique: Debuting in 2009, for unique interior projects less than 10,000 square feet.

If you did an interesting project that fits in one of these categories, download the form and enter. Applause may follow.—Gary L. Parr

Talking trash

I attended my college reunion this month and walked around campus, noticing what had changed in the 30 years since I received my diploma. Some buildings had been razed, others looked a little shabbier. A new dormitory occupied a rose garden where we had held a post-graduation reception.
   Being amongst all those youngsters made me feel a bit old and in the way. Then I spied a newspaper recycling bin, which cheered me up because it meant the kids haven’t given up on an ancient medium. It’s not all online, download, or freeshare with the next generation. They have stuff they throw away. Do they ever. Colleges will recycle an estimated 50 million tons of waste in this year’s RecycleMania competition. That’s pretty cool.
   When I returned to the office, I found a catalog of waste bins from Magnuson Group, Woodridge, IL. These stylish containers would go a long way in sprucing up dear old alma mater.Jim Carper

The T3, designed by Studio Manade, is for indoor use.

The T3, designed by Studio Manade, is for indoor use.

Magma Design's Moai, for outdoor areas, has icons showing acceptable waste.

Magma Design's Moai, for outdoor areas, has icons showing acceptable waste.

The satin stainless steel Bilbao receptacle, designed by I+D Vilagrasa, is available in black.

The satin stainless steel Bilbao receptacle, designed by I+D Vilagrasa, is available in black.

Fun with Corian

Talented people can have so much fun with DuPont’s Corian material. The most recent example of this is the Corian Bench Inventions collection that resulted from a collaboration between C.H. Briggs Co., Reading, PA, an independently owned distributor of interior and specialty building products; DuPont Corian, Wilmington, DE; and elite Philadelphia-area architects, designers, and fabricators. The object of the project was to create inventive and contemporary benches made entirely of DuPont Corian. The resulting benches are being exhibited, through Oct. 31, in three Philadelphia locations as part of the DesignPhiladelphia event.
   “It is truly thrilling to have the opportunity to exhibit the incredible, avant-garde work of our local architects and designers during DesignPhiladelphia,” said Luis Arias, chief marketing officer, C.H. Briggs Co. “We are honored to support Philadelphia’s national reputation for the arts, while also showcasing the limitless possibilities of Corian as an inspirational and innovative design material.”
   The benches combine technology and design to produce stirring images in unexpected locations, many of which pay homage to deep-rooted Philadelphia traditions and push the limits of a traditional bench. The 14 designs include illuminated crates and futuristic pods, stoops, ribbons, and Lego-like benches.
   Here are some examples:

"Milk," designed by Todd Tully Danner of ArQitecture, Wilmington, DE, and created by McGrory Inc., Kennett Sq., PA.

"Milk," designed by Todd Tully Danner of ArQitecture, Wilmington, DE, and created by McGrory Inc., Kennett Sq., PA.

"Permutation," designed by Andrew Simmons of Francis Cauffman, Philadelphia, and created by Allegheny Solid Surface Technologies, Hanover, PA.

"Permutation," designed by Andrew Simmons of Francis Cauffman, Philadelphia, and created by Allegheny Solid Surface Technologies, Hanover, PA.

Foreground: “S’il Vous Play: Shipping Crates in Faux Bois,” designed by Kevin Derrick of Bahdeebahdu, Philadelphia, and created by R.D. Wing Co., Inc., headquartered in Kirkland, WA. Mid-ground: “Leg-Go,” designed by Kate High of EwingCole, Philadelphia, and created by Henry H. Ross & Son, Inc. Lititz, PA. Background: “Conversation Bench,” designed by Rick Marencic, Daroff Design, Inc. Philadelphia, and created by Allegheny Solid Surface Technologies, Hanover, PA.

Foreground: “S’il Vous Play: Shipping Crates in Faux Bois,” designed by Kevin Derrick of Bahdeebahdu, Philadelphia, and created by R.D. Wing Co., Inc., headquartered in Kirkland, WA. Mid-ground: “Leg-Go,” designed by Kate High of EwingCole, Philadelphia, and created by Henry H. Ross & Son, Inc. Lititz, PA. Background: “Conversation Bench,” designed by Rick Marencic, Daroff Design, Inc. Philadelphia, and created by Allegheny Solid Surface Technologies, Hanover, PA.

   You can see all of the benches at the C.H. Briggs website. DesignPhiladelphia is a city-wide cultural festival featuring more than 135 exhibitions, workshops, studio tours, lectures, special events, book signings, installations, and product roll-outs. Learn more at the DesignPhiladelphia 2009 website.—Gary L. Parr