Big energy payoff for NY Times building

 

The New York Times building was designed to maximize light usage and be as energy efficient as possible. Light-level tuning in the building sets the appropriate target light level for each space. Occupancy sensors turn off lights when no one is in a space, and dim lights when enough daylight is present.

The New York Times building was designed to maximize light usage and be as energy efficient as possible.

In the October 2008 premier issue of Building Power, our every-issue supplement that addresses energy issues in commercial buildings, we highlighted the, now famous, New York Times building (read the article here) in New York City. The systems designed into the building to save energy and improve occupant comfort and indoor-air quality are quite impressive, on paper. As with any energy-saving system, what’s on paper and reality can be vastly different. That’s the case with the New York Times building. The difference is huge and it’s very positive.
    According to information provided by Lutron Electronics Co. Inc., Coopersburg, PA, this week at Lightfair 2009 in New York, the lighting-control systems installed in the building are “achieving a ‘stunning’ 70 percent energy savings compared to the ambitious energy-efficiency benchmark the building was designed to meet.” The lighting-control systems are Lutron’s EcoSystem and Quantum products.
   “We designed our building to use 1.28 watts per square foot of lighting power. With Quantum, it’s using only 0.38 [W/sq. ft.]—that’s 70% less,” said Glenn Hughes, director of construction for the New York Times Co.
   The lighting control strategies employed in the building include:

  • level tuning (setting the appropriate target light level for each space)
  • daylight harvesting (automatically dimming electric lights when enough daylight is present)
  • occupancy sensing (turning lights off when space is vacant).

It is estimated that the reduced lighting energy usage will result in an annual savings of about $315,000. In addition, about 1,250 metric tons of CO2 emissions will be prevented each year.—Gary L. Parr

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